Bookmark
EMPLOYMENT / EDUCATION / TRAINING

A Midwestern Frontier University’s Readiness to Support Student Veterans

August, 2018
Article:

The goal of this study was to assess how prepared a Midwest Frontier University was to address the needs of student veterans. To assess this, a cross-sectional convenience sample of faculty and staff members (N=114) completed an anonymous quantitative survey. Three main themes were identified from the survey: awareness, needs and barriers. Results indicate that the university is supportive of student veteran needs.

Abstract

America’s veterans are driven to success and that drive does not end when they leave the military. They want to continue to be productive and accomplish their goals in a new way and for many; higher education is their new battleground. In 2016, over 700 student veterans (SVs) attended a Midwest frontier University and SV enrollment continues to increase each semester. The goal of this study was to assess how prepared a Midwest Frontier University is to address student veteran (SV) needs using a cross-sectional convenience sample of faculty & staff members (N=114) who completed an anonymous quantitative survey. The findings are divided into three major sections: support, needs and barriers as identified by faculty and staff members. The support area is focused on existing specific services offered to student veterans. The needs section is further focused on what student veteran needs are at the University as perceived by staff and faculty members. The final section, barriers, explains obstacles that the university currently faces to address student veteran needs as highlighted by the participants. Results indicate that the university is supportive of SV needs, but both groups agree that training for faculty and staff on the SV population and a centralized online resource is an area of utmost need.

Full Reference

Wild, M., & Mahapatra, N. (2018). A Midwestern Frontier University’s Readiness to Support Student Veterans. Journal of Veterans Studies, 3(2), 32–44. DOI: http://doi.org/10.21061/jvs.v3i2.56

Report a problem with this article