HEALTH / WELL-BEING

Alzheimer’s Disease prevalence, costs, and prevention for military personnel and veterans

Article

This article examines a growing population of aging military veterans who may have an added risk of Alzheimer’s Disease as a consequence of traumatic brain injury, posttraumatic stress disorder, and/or service-related injuries.

Abstract

By 2050, more than 13 million Americans of all ages are estimated to be living with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the aggregate costs of care will swell to approximately $1.2 trillion. The rapidly climbing number of those affected with AD includes a growing population of aging military veterans affected who may have an added risk for the disease as a consequence of traumatic brain injury, posttraumatic stress disorder, and/or service-related injuries. The increasing number of individuals, the long duration of disability, and the rising cost of care for AD and other dementia to our society are important public health challenges facing many older adults. These challenges are further compounded by a burgeoning military veteran population that is much younger, with an increased risk of AD and other dementia, and who may experience decades-long periods of disability and care. This outlook underscores the critical need for investments in research at the federal and international levels to accelerate the pace of progress in developing breakthrough discoveries that will change the trajectory of AD and related dementia.

Full Reference

Sibenera, L., Zaganjor, I., Snydera, H.M., Bain, L.J., Egge, R., Carrillo, M.C.. 2014. Alzheimer's Disease prevalence, costs, and prevention for military personnel and veterans Volume 10, Issue 3, Supplement, June 2014, Pages S105-S110