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HEALTH / WELL-BEING

Differences in Adjustment to Civilian Life between Male and Female Canadian Armed Forces Veterans

February, 2016
Article:

This study adds to the literature on male/ female differences by focusing on the transition from military to civilian life in the context of the Canadian Armed Forces. The following were the research questions: 1) What are the differences between male and female veterans in transition to civilian life experiences, including experiences related to physical health conditions (PHC) and mental health conditions (MHC), level of adjustment, mastery, life stress, and level of satisfaction with elements of civilian life? 2) To what extent is adjustment to civilian life similar for both men and women after adjusting for MHCs and PHCs, mastery, life stress, and satisfaction with job, leisure, family, and finances?

Abstract

The transition from military to civilian life is an important time for veterans, and understanding male/ female differences is an important dimension of this research. This article reports on veterans of the Canadian Armed Forces 2-12 years after release that participated in the Survey on Transition to Civilian Life. The goal was to examine male/ female differences in adjustment to civilian life, as well as physical and mental health conditions, life stress, mastery and satisfaction with elements of civilian life (job, leisure, family, friends and finances). Analyses using ordinal logistic regression reveal that adjustment was similar for both men and women once those other multiple variables were taken into account. The majority of both male and female veterans adjust well. Future research should examine how best to assist the 25% of both male and female veterans for whom this is not the case.

Full Reference

Hachey, K. K., Sudom, K., Sweet, J., Thompson, J. M., Mary Beth MacLean, M. B., and VanTil, L., 2016. “Differences in Adjustment to Civilian Life between Male and Female Canadian Armed Forces Veterans”, Res Militaris, an online social science journal, ERGOMAS, 2, Women in the Military (Part Two).

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