OTHER SOCIAL ISSUES

Helping War Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Incarcerated Individuals’ Role in Therapeutic Animal Programs.

Article

An article which examines how incarcerated individuals train rescued shelter dogs as therapeutic canines for veterans with PTSD.

Abstract

A grassroots movement of nonprofit, nongovernmental organizations is creating programs in which incarcerated individuals train rescued shelter dogs as therapeutic canines for Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Driven in part by reports of Veterans not receiving adequate treatment for PTSD, the programs are the latest iteration of prison-based animal programs and are founded on the principles of animal therapy and healing powers of animals. The far-reaching and deleterious collateral consequences of PTSD create social and economic burdens on the country; providing beneficial interventions for Veterans is a pressing social problem. Without oversight, a patchwork of agencies has developed that provides Veterans with dogs with varying levels of training and differing abilities. To best serve the needs of Veterans, the programs need regulation and standardized methods of training

Full Reference

Furst, G. (2016) Helping War Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Incarcerated Individuals' Role in Therapeutic Animal Programs, Journal of Psychosocial Nursing & Mental Health Services, Vol 54 (5), p.49-57