HEALTH / WELL-BEING

Out of uniform: psychosocial issues experienced and coping mechanisms used by Veterans during the military–civilian transition

Article

Abstract

Introduction: The military–civilian transition is an important moment in the life course of Veterans. Collecting and interpreting data on psychosocial problems experienced during the transition make it possible to outline reintegration needs. Methods: A qualitative approach including semi-structured interviews was adopted. A total of 17 Veterans participated in the study. Participants speak French at home, live in Quebec, and were released from the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) no more than five years before being interviewed. Results: Among participants released from the CAF for medical reasons, the main spheres of life in which problems occur are the medical / mental health, social, family, and personal spheres; among those released voluntarily, the main problem spheres are mental health, social, family, and financial. To remedy their psychosocial problems, the majority of participants relied on two coping mechanisms: social support and family support. Despite certain points of convergence, significant differences exist between the transitional course of Veterans released voluntarily and that of Veterans released for medical reasons,, which appears very arduous indeed. Discussion: This research enables a better understanding of the psychosocial problems experienced by Veterans during the transitional process and the coping mechanisms used to counter them.

Full Reference

Out of uniform: psychosocial issues experienced and coping mechanisms used by Veterans during the military–civilian transition. Dave Blackburn. Journal of Military, Veteran, and Family Health 2017 3:1, 62–69.