HEALTH / WELL-BEING

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in the Files of Australian Servicemen Hospitalized in 1942–1952

Article

This article investigates post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology in Australian servicemen hospitalized 1942–1952.

 

Abstract

Objective: To investigate post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology in servicemen hospitalized 1942–1952. Method: Hospital files of servicemen (n = 590) were studied and PTSD symptoms in groups, based on service experience, were compared. Results: Based on their hospital files, 19% of servicemen were classified as having partial PTSD. No full cases of PTSD were identified, due primarily to the small number of recorded avoidance symptoms and the limited information in relation to the stressor criterion. Prisoners of war had the highest reported avoidance and lowest intrusive symptoms compared with other combatants. Conclusions: PTSD symptoms may have been common during and after World War II. At that time avoidance was not considered a symptom of disorder. Intrusive and arousal symptoms may be the core symptoms of PTSD and avoidance symptoms need to be reconsidered.

Full Reference

Burges Watson, P., Daniels, B., 2008. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in the Files of Australian Servicemen Hospitalized in 1942–1952. Australasian Psychiatry. 16:1. 18-21.