HEALTH / WELL-BEING

Protective and Vulnerability Factors Contributing to Resilience in Post-9/11 Veterans With Service-Related Injuries in Postsecondary Education

Article

This article examines differences in psychosocial factors, such as social support and occupation, and health-related vulnerability, such as posttraumatic factors and depression. The article suggests that post-911 veterans with service-related injuries are at a disadvantage in terms of resilience.

Abstract

To examine differences in psychosocial protective factors (social support, meaningful occupation, and academic self-efficacy) and health-related vulnerability factors (posttraumatic stress, depression, and somatic symptoms) contributing to resilience in post-9/11 veterans with service-related injuries and non-veterans in post-secondary education. The veteran sample demonstrated lower levels of psychosocial protective factors and higher levels of health-related vulnerability factors compared with non-veterans (|0.49| to |1.56|). Psychosocial protective factors were consistently negatively associated with health-related vulnerability factors (−.27 to −.63). Post-9/11 veterans with service-related injuries are at a substantial disadvantage in terms of resilience; lower protective factors and elevated vulnerability factors may increase their risk for poor campus integration and impede academic achievement.

Full Reference

Eakman, A. M., Schelly, C. and Henry, K. L., 2016. Protective and Vulnerability Factors Contributing to Resilience in Post-9/11 Veterans With Service-Related Injuries in Post-secondary Education. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 70(1).