HEALTH / WELL-BEING

Relationships between posttraumatic stress disorder, attachment, self-blame, and social support among women veterans with a history of childhood and/or military sexual trauma

Article

This study examines the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, trauma-related self-blame, social support and attachment, among female veterans with a childhood and/or military sexual trauma (MST).

Abstract

The present study examined the relationships between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity, trauma-related self-blame, perceived social support, and attachment among women veterans with a history of childhood trauma and/or military sexual trauma (MST), using self-reported inventories. Adult attachment was measured with the Relationship Scales Questionnaire, PTSD symptom severity with the PTSD Checklist - Civilian version, trauma-related self-blame with the Posttraumatic Cognitions Inventory, perceived social support with the Kessler’s Perceived Social Support scale, and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 was used to assess general psychological maladjustment. Extending results from previous studies on PTSD, the positive relationships between PTSD symptom severity and attachment-related avoidance, as well as with trauma-related self-blame were found among women veterans with prior trauma history.

Full Reference

Park, S. E., 2013. Relationships between posttraumatic stress disorder, attachment, self-blame, and social support among women veterans with a history of childhood and/or military sexual trauma. PhD. Faculty of the Rosemead School of Psychology, Biola University.