EMPLOYMENT / EDUCATION / TRAINING

Socioeconomic Status of World War II Veterans by Race: An Empirical Test of the Bridging Hypothesis

Article

This article explores the reasons for positive returns to military duty for World War II veterans years after discharge, taking into consideration socioeconomic factors.

Abstract

Reasons for positive returns to military duty for World War II veterans twenty years after discharge are explored. The bridging hypothesis appears to be overly broad; what matters most for white veterans is education, training, and personal independence. In contrast to the bridging literature, black veterans generally benefited less than white veterans from bridging experiences but gained substantially from employment in government, which may be associated with the veterans' preference status of ex-servicemen.

Full Reference

Fredland, J. E. and Little, R. D., 1985. Socioeconomic Status of World War II Veterans by Race: An Empirical Test of the Bridging Hypothesis. Social Science Quarterly, 66(3).