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HEALTH / WELL-BEING

Pain in Canadian Veterans: Analysis of data from the Survey on Transition to Civilian Life

March, 2015
Article:

This paper seeks to explore and describe the prevalence of chronic pain and associated social, health, employment, disability, physical and mental health factors, in Canadian veterans.

Abstract

Little is known about the prevalence of chronic pain among Veterans outside the United States. This article aims to describe the prevalence of chronic pain and associated sociodemographic, health behaviour, employment/income, disability, and physical and mental health factors in Canadian Veterans. Forty-one percent of the Veteran population experienced constant chronic pain and 23% experienced intermittent chronic pain. Twenty-five percent reported pain interference. Needing help with tasks of daily living, back problems, arthritis, gastrointestinal conditions and age ≥30 years were independently associated with chronic pain. Needing help with tasks of daily living, back problems, arthritis, mental health conditions, age ≥30 years, gastrointestinal conditions, low social support and noncommissioned member rank were associated with pain interference. These findings provide evidence for agencies and those supporting the well-being of Veterans, and inform longitudinal studies to better understand the determinants and life course effects of chronic pain in military Veterans.

Full Reference

VanDenKerkhof, E. G., VanTil, L., Thompson, J. M., Sweet, J., Hopman, W. M., Carley, M. E. and Sudom, K., 2015. Pain in Canadian Veterans: Analysis of data from the Survey on Transition to Civilian Life. Pain Research Management, 20(2), pp. 89-95.

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